aviation culture

Read the article listed: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/can-cultural-issues-cause-plane-crashes-fabrizio-poli/
Review one of the accidents discussed in the article
Culture can come in many forms and sizes from small niche groups to nationwide. Write a post (350 words) that includes:One group attribute (does not need to be limited to an item from the reading or presentation) that you believe is important in the aviation industry
From the accident you reviewed, was this attribute present and did it play a role in the errors leading to the accident?
Discuss how this particular trait may be in conflict or aligned with other cultural groups (whether corporate, industrial, regional, or national). This could be from experience or study.
Note: this discussion need not be personal in nature; however, culture can be a sensitive topic. Care will be taken that posts and responses will be respectful.

Respond to this post (100 words) with a meaningful contribution to the conversation different PDF. This first attribute that came to mind for me was simply “being vocal”. I say this because I see a ot of group think that happens around me in my daily life, so for a pilot, being able to express that you feel something is wrong or feels “off” you can feel confident that you have truly done all you can do- by taking vocal action leading up to physical. If no one ever spoke out in the aviation industry innovation would come to a hault and more and more accidents would most likely occur. If we lose all communication with eachother then the industry will collaspe and people won’t trust airlines. I chose to look at Avianca Flight 052 and found that while I was reading the NTSB stated exactly what I was looking for, “the probable cause of this accident was the failure of the flight crew to adequately manage the airplane’s fuel load, and their failure to communicate an emergency fuel situation to air traffic control before fuel exhaustion occurred.” So to answer the question, yes and no. My attribute was NOT present within the role. However this can’t all be blamed on simply not speaking out, this was also a language barrier issue as well. This trait can align in almsot any situation if you ask me. For example, in a fast food resturant, if a low end employee notices that the fry machine is malfunctioning when they’re using it but the manager “doesn’t have time for your issue” its good to have an outlet for employees to turn to in case they have concerns or issues with something or their environment because they’re the ones that know their position the best. Communication is TRULY key, and we can’t be afraid to communicate.

Aviation Culture

Read the article listed: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/can-cultural-issues-cause-plane-crashes-fabrizio-poli/
Review one of the accidents discussed in the article
Culture can come in many forms and sizes from small niche groups to nationwide. Write a post (350 words) that includes:One group attribute (does not need to be limited to an item from the reading or presentation) that you believe is important in the aviation industry
From the accident you reviewed, was this attribute present and did it play a role in the errors leading to the accident?
Discuss how this particular trait may be in conflict or aligned with other cultural groups (whether corporate, industrial, regional, or national). This could be from experience or study.
Note: this discussion need not be personal in nature; however, culture can be a sensitive topic. Care will be taken that posts and responses will be respectful.

Respond to this post (100 words) with a meaningful contribution to the conversation different PDF. Personally, I think the consideration of different cultural contexts in important in the aviation industry. Whether a flight crew is assertive and direct or more reserved and deliberate is important because it affects communication. Consequently, communication is critical in aviation to avoid instances such as mid-air collisions and emergency management.On January 25, 1990, a flight from Bogota, Colombia, to New York City crashed 20 miles from the airport when they ran out of fuel and all four engines flamed out. A difference in cultural contexts contributed to this accident. The American controllers expected Avianca 052 to be direct and candid about their fuel situation. They also assumed that the flight would raise up their issue and force ATC to pay attention before the situation became truly critical. However, this expectation did not match up with Colombia’s tendency towards more of a high context culture. This means Flight 052’s negotiations (in this case informing ATC that they needed priority because of low fuel) were slower and more focused on relationship building. They likely didn’t want to intrude or become burdensome and were leaning towards establishing social trust. Because they didn’t display the urgency or direct assertiveness that would be expected from US and Scandinavian aircrews (low context cultures), controllers didn’t recognize the severity of the situation.To remedy this miscommunication, it may prove useful to provide culture-based training to US air traffic controllers who deal with a lot of international traffic. It could cover things like which countries are more likely to be assertive about emergencies and which countries ATC may need to be more forward with and ask more questions to determine if they are in an emergency and respond accordingly.Context culture is also applicable to many other situations. Another aviation related example is the difference between general aviation and commercial flight operations. General aviation is usually a lot more relaxed since there are less regulations to follow and less lives in their hands. Whether or not someone allows you to fly a rental aircraft for example generally based on the personal relations they’ve had with you so far and good will (high context). Skill is sometimes also determined through a check-out flight, but that is about all. In contrast, commercial operations are much more focused on expertise and performance (low context). Pilots must constantly be doing recurrent training and proving they have the ability to operate the aircraft safely.