Running head: VIOLENCE AND MISREPRESENTATION OF BLACK PEOPLE 1 3 VIOLENCE AND

Running head: VIOLENCE AND MISREPRESENTATION OF BLACK PEOPLE

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VIOLENCE AND MISREPRESENTATION OF BLACK PEOPLE

Violence And Misrepresentation Of Black People
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Authors of African American history portray violence and war as important elements of this community’s lives. The portrayal of violence and war from the slave ships to the slave revolutions shows black people as always the misrepresented victims. This argument is notable from the following discussion.

The earliest recorded form of violence can be traced to the slave trade. Mustakeem (2016) portrays how Black people revolted in the slave ships. However, the documentation in the newspapers never told their stories but that of the lost or injured sailors. Nevertheless, these Black people felt the brunt of a trade that separated them from their families and exposed them to unfavorable conditions at sea and into a life of slavery. Hahn (2009) also shared the same message, albeit from the perspective of the slave revolution. His account shows the struggles of the slaves that chose to revolt and joined the Union lines. Unfortunately, the slaveholders they left behind saw this move as a great offense punishable by death. Thus, regardless of the direction they chose, these Black people would be subject to violence. The options were either to live under the heavy yoke of their master or risk rebelling. The latter option meant certain death if caught or joining Union lines and putting their lives on the line for something they believed.

However, even though these accounts, it is notable that Black people upheld some values that were rarely mentioned. Despite the deplorable conditions of living in slavery, they still supported the US and fought for its well-being. Nash (2006) cites how they refused to side with the British despite being promised freedom. However, these patterns did not save them from unfair treatment and difficult lives. For instance, Equiano (2009) recounts how Black children were kidnapped and how vicious punishments were advanced to anyone who engaged in this act. Nevertheless, it becomes easy to overlook how Black people stood with America during the fight against the British.

Notably, Black people were always surrounded by violence and unfavorable conditions. However, they were never seen as the victims. Instead, the authors noted that their position was consistently ignored or misrepresented.

References

Equiano, O. (2009). The interesting narrative of the life of Olaudah Equiano. Portland, OR:The Floating Press.

Hahn, S. (2009). Did We Miss the Greatest Slave Rebellion in Modern History? In The political worlds of slavery and freedom, 55-114. Cambridge, MA: : Harvard University Press.

Mustakeem, S. M. (2016). Slavery at sea: Terror, sex, and sickness in the Middle Passage. Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press.

Nash, G. B. (2006). The Black American’s revolution. In The forgotten fifth account. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.