Why this class?

Article 1

 Naghshineh, S., Hafler, J. P., Miller, A. R., Blanco, M. A., Lipsitz, S. R., Dubroff, R. P., Khoshbin, S., & Katz, J. T. (2008). Formal Art Observation Training Improves Medical Students’ Visual Diagnostic Skills. Journal of General Internal Medicine23(7), 991-997. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-008-0667-0

The authors Naghshineh et al., (2008) objective was to improve the medical and dental student’s visual literacy skills through observation of artwork, understanding the concepts of arts, and apply the skills for patient care. The study was based on the visual thinking strategies techniques and conducted by professional art educators. The study involved control and intervention groups with similar demographic characteristics from Harvard Medical and Dental School. 

The outcome from the study showed that observational skills, together with those related to clinical medicine, can be obtained through the works of art and medical imagery. The participants from the study showed improvement in making accurate observations. They were likely to apply the concepts of fine arts, which are relevant to physical examinations such as symmetry and color. One of the limitations of the study was that it was conducted in only one institution, and the ability to generalize the outcomes in other institutions is unknown. It is difficult to replicate in schools with no art educators and museums.

Article 2

Shapiro, J., Rucker, L., & Beck, J. (2006). Training the clinical eye and mind: using the arts to develop medical students’ observational and pattern recognition skills. Medical Education40(3), 263-268. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2006.02389.x

The authors of the article Shapiro et al., (2006) conducted a qualitative study to get better insights on the similarities and differences between clinical teaching strategies and arts-based strategies to express pattern recognition and observational skills. Recognition and interpretation of a pattern of data is essential in medical decision making.

            Some of the concepts included in art-based were deep seeing, pattern recognition, self, and other emotional awareness, and attention to relationships and story.  Both approaches clinical teaching strategies and arts-based strategies were effective in training pattern recognition, observational skills, and cover the same concepts, such as justification and retelling the story. Clinically based training was successful in displaying many dimensions of pattern recognition because the session included elements of differential diagnosis, which was not presented in art-based. The art-based sessions, on the other hand, explained pattern recognition and observation using symbols and metaphors. It was concluded that art based sessions should be included in clinical teaching to get a complete picture of the patient.

Comparison and contrast of the article’s methodology and argument

Article one by Naghshineh et al. (2008) used both qualitative and quantitative methods, while the s article two by  Shapiro et al. (2006)  used only qualitative methods. However, they are both related to artwork appreciation. The two articles explain how, including artwork, observation in medical studies is going to improve patient care.

 The two articles used different methods of data collection, and article one used mixed methods of data collection, which involves the collection, analysis, and integration of qualitative and quantitative research to determine the impact of formal art observation. In contrast, article two used both interviews and focus groups. There is also differences in the samples used.  Article one samples was composed of 58 participants, while in article two, the sample was composed of 38 participants. The two articles used the same analysis method, which is qualitative analysis, to understand the phenomena.

 What I hope to learn from this class and what I can do to improve my learning experience

I hope I will be able to learn how to investigate arts work and increase my visual literacy skills. Observation is more than just seeing, but it involves a mental process, and I will be able to interpret objects and people accurately.  To improve my learning experience in art observation, I will participate in an art exhibition, and there I will take time to look and try paying attention to details. I will also try to describe what I see from the artwork, then interpret the art and try relating it to my life or other artwork.

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References

Naghshineh, S., Hafler, J. P., Miller, A. R., Blanco, M. A., Lipsitz, S. R., Dubroff, R. P., Khoshbin, S., & Katz, J. T. (2008). Formal Art Observation Training Improves Medical Students’ Visual Diagnostic Skills. Journal of General Internal Medicine23(7), 991-997. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-008-0667-0

Shapiro, J., Rucker, L., & Beck, J. (2006). Training the clinical eye and mind: using the arts to develop medical students’ observational and pattern recognition skills. Medical Education40(3), 263-268. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2006.02389.x